How Naps Benefit Your Skin

Sleep might be the closest thing to the fountain of youth.  I have never had problems with getting 7-8 hours of good sleep before, but as I’m aging I tend to wake up more often through out the night. Napping has become more important for my health and beauty routine these days.  I have always loved taking naps.  Naps can range in duration from 5 minutes up to 90 minutes. The best time to nap is in the afternoon between 3:00-5:00pm for about 90 minutes. During these hours you fall asleep faster. This sleep is said to be  more “efficient” because you experience deep sleep or “slow wave sleep.” During this mid-afternoon nap you go through a complete sleep cycle from the lightest stage through the deepest stage and back again, so you’ll wake feeling refreshed.

One of the biggest benefits to “deep sleep” napping is the effect of anti-aging and the reduction of cortisol in body.  Cortisol also called “the stress hormone,” is secreted in higher levels during the body’s fight or flight response to stress experienced in our daily lives.  Napping can help reduce cortisol in the blood and restore a state of hormone equilibrium thus giving your skin “beauty sleep.”

Napping (beauty sleep) is a natural way of improving skin for both women and men according to a study from University Hospital’s Case Medical Center.  Napping can help you have fewer wrinkles, tighter skin and even out the skin tone.

Skin repairs itself when we are in a deep sleep. It makes new collagen preventing the skin from sagging giving us plumper skin!  During sleep our bodies boost blood flow to skin which means when we wake we have a healthier glow. Sleep deprivation causes a decrease in blood flow to the skin creating dullness.  I prefer a boost of blood flow especially as I’m aging. People who don’t get enough rest appear less healthy.

Napping your way to better skin gives a whole new meaning to beauty rest. The research from University Hospitals Case medical center published in Science Daily found this to be true.  Scientists discovered that sleep reversed the appearance of fine lines, reduced signs of skin aging, improved the rate of recovery from environmental stressors, and improved recovery from UV radiation exposure. These are four good reasons to start napping if you aren’t already. So go ahead and take some naps if you need them. Napping may be the easiest way to good health and beautiful skin.

YASOU!

(image: pixby/pexels)

YASOU Skin Care Word Search

We decided to have some fun and created a skin care word search for your amusement.  How many skin care terms can you find.  All you have to do is print the graphic, grab some juice or coffee and give it a go.  All the terms for you to find are listed on the right hand side so you can cross them off as you find them.  Hope you enjoy and maybe learn a new term or two.

 

Self-Care is a Beauty Routine

Springtime!  The sun’s light shines longer. The air and soil warm. Trees sprout leaves. Seeds grow, flowers bloom, birds sing. From nature’s beautiful emergence from dormancy to life, we can all learn a lesson about beauty routines and self-care. Spring is the best time to plant vegetable seeds. Will those seeds grow into strong, healthy plants without water, sunlight, soil, space and someone to tend to them? Will we grow strong and healthy if our personal needs are unmet? Can we live life well without seeing the beauty within and amongst us? Opening ourselves up to beauty and to self-care is the surest way to tend to our physical and emotional well-being. In other words, self-care is a beautyroutine with beauty going way beyond the way we look, to the way we feel, hear, taste, smell and see the world.

 

You and your needs are important. A happy, confidant person takes risks and pushes their potential. However, do not create goals or expectations for your self-care beauty routine. It isn’t a to-do list, but it should be a priority. It’s supposed to feel slightly indulgent. Nature takes care of itself in wonderous ways. You can too.

 

Self-care beauty in the morning

Drink water when you wake up to hydrate your body and lift your mood. Nourish your skin with a vegan cellular day cream. Walk around the block or go workout in a gym. Enjoy a morning ritual of your own creation. Whether it’s a cup of coffee, reading a poem or doing an early morning stretch, make it your own. Brushing your teeth doesn’t count, though that is important.

 

Self-care beauty in the moment

Let your senses bring you to the present moment wherever you are. Forget about the past and future, focus on now. What’s in front of you? Behind you? Above or below you? Does it move? Is there color, texture, smell? Relish the moment. Be mindful. This simple act of mindfulness can reduce stress and rumination while boosting working memory, focus, cognitive flexibility and self-insight. It can eliminate that feeling of always being busy and rushed. Now that’s a beautiful thing.

 

Self-care beauty at work

Take short breaks during your workday to stay happy, motivated and productive. Go outdoors to feel the wind in your hair. Walk through office hallways. Say hello to someone you don’t know. Ask others about their work. Write down the things you like about your work. Whether you’re standing or sitting most of the day, watch your posture. Good posture reducesfatigue and strain on your body’s ligaments and muscles as well as stress on your spine. Also, protect your private life by setting boundaries between your personal and professional life. You don’t need to be accessible 24 hours a day.

 

Self-care beauty in the evening

Get at least seven to nine hours of sleep each night. During sleep your brain merges memories, eliminates toxins and creates neural pathways. Give it enough time to do its thing. Remember to apply a vegan cell renewal night cream so that your skin can do its thing during sleep – repair damaged cells, build up collagen and hyaluronic acid molecules, and moisturize.

 

Self-care beauty any time

Each day create a happiness moment. Be aware of what makes you happy. Laugh, cry, hug. Expressing emotion is a release.

Your brain loves novelty so shake up your routine. Take a different route to work. Change your nail color. Wear new makeup or put on a flirty spring dress to change your look.

Eat healthy. Create your own menu for the week that includes fresh foods. This can help you avoid impulse eating due to a lack of time. Set a regular meal time. Enjoy your meal, whether you are alone or with others. Consume protein and carbs to stay fueled.

Stop the negative self-talk. Once you hear that voice replace it with a thought you enjoy – a fun vacation, a beautiful mountain or prairie, a loved one’s smile. Beauty outweighs the negative.

Nurturing a plant or garden has therapeutic benefits. Nurturing others through volunteer work can be self-care since what you give is often returned tenfold. Good Karma.

Yoga and meditation merge mind, body and spirit. A daily practice of even several minutes a day can reap lots of benefits for your well-being. Increase your energy, while reducing blood pressure, anxiety and depression.

Lighten your load, literally. Only carry what you truly need and want. Baggage slows us down and wreaks havoc on our posture.

Fresh flowers, a glass of wine, a bath and an all-natural hydrating body cream will please your senses. Keeping your skin moisturized and smooth to the touch is an easy way to pamper your body. It creates a soothing sensation that makes you feel prized.

Create moods with lighting, candles, music, a good book or movie. Take time to relax. Invite friends or just breathe and sit with your own thoughts. Write down a few things you are grateful for. This will shift your mindset to one of abundance rather than scarcity.

Finally, respect your own mind-body-spirit needs. Your health and beauty practices are different from anyone else. Do what’s right for you.

(photo: Daria Shevtsova/pexels)

How Skin Reflects Your Individuality

 

“I think the reward for conformity is that everyone likes you except yourself.”
― Rita Mae Brown

 

One of our most important natural assets that evolution has given us is our skin. Skin protects, insulates, and regulates our body. Each body contains its own genetic and geographic remnants. What your skin looks like reflects your individuality in multiple ways. Sometimes the look is made through choices and some are ingrained.  Either way, let your skin tell the story of who you are.

 

Skin as identifier
Your skin can literally identify who you are. Your fingerprints are unique to you. The thin epidermis layer of skin on your fingers begins to form while still in your mother’s womb. When a baby starts using fingers to touch, the pressure interaction with surfaces starts to form faint “friction ridges.” If burned or cut, fingerprints will grow back over time exactly as they were. Skin elasticity does decrease as we age so fingerprint ridges are less prominent in seniors.

Skin also contains personalized bacterial communities. What we touch leaves an imprint on an object’s surface. Research studies show that skin-associated bacteria can be recovered from surfaces. It can be used to differentiate objects handled by different individuals. Our skin actually leaves a trail of our personal touch.

 

Beauty diversified
At the age of 20 French-American model Maeva Giani Marshall had a stroke and was treated for kidney problems that caused hyperpigmentation on her face. The burn marks from medication faded into dark smudged like freckles. Of her look, she says: “I want to show people that you’re allowed to be different and don’t have to change for anyone.”

When Salem Mitchell posted selfies on her twitter account people made fun of her freckles. But her speckled tawny brown skin and personal confidence grabbed the attention of Ford Models Agency, where she is now signed.

Women of the Middle Ages used ointments, dyes, and cosmetics to hide what they considered skin flaws, including freckles. They wanted pale skin which was associated with high status. This goes to a point art critic Jerry Saltz made recently in his article How to Be an Artist for New York magazine: “Don’t be reined in by other people’s definition of skill or beauty or be boxed in by what is supposedly high or low.”

Birth marks, scars, and skin disease such as vitiligo all tell a story of who you are. Rather than diminishing your look it can enhance by emphasizing your individuality. Consider it a twist on conventional beauty.

 

Skin Color and adaptation
The color of your skin tells its own story of geography and sun exposure. Through the ages skin has adapted to conditions. When humans started walking on two legs in Africa, they lost much of their body hair and their skin increased the number of sweat glands to keep them cool in a hot climate. Their skin produced a lot of melanin to keep skin dark, acting as a natural sunscreen against the sun’s harsh UV rays.

A person’s skin color (melanin found in skin cells) is related to their ancestry and heritage. When humans moved to milder cooler climates where UV rays were less strong, the skin adapted to a paler color to better absorb Vitamin D from sun rays and folic acid. Melanin content varies by gender and age and differs on body parts as well. Consider the palms of your hands and feet.

 

Skin and emotion
Skin blushes, gets goosebumps and regulates temperature according to how we are feeling. Some professional training companies analyze a person’s emotional reactions to situations by reading their skin temperature. Skin may help you to understand your own emotional intelligence. A study on facial thermal response measured skin temperature at the tip of the nose when showing positive, neutral and negative pictures to participants. The skin temperature remained the same when participants were shown the neutral picture but changed to warmer when viewing the positive and cooler when viewing the negative pictures. It seems the skin of your nose knows.

Being one of your most important natural assets, protect and nurture your skin. Let your skin reflect your individuality and prove you’re one of a kind.

(photo: Milena Fotografia/pexels)

Dark Chocolate May Be The Perfect Valentine For Your Skin

Why? Dark chocolate contains lots of healthy antioxidants, iron, calcium and vitamins that nourish your skin. Made from beans harvested from the cocoa tree, delicious dark chocolate contains more than 60 percent of cocoa solids, is low in sugar and made with cocoa butter, a saturated fat not associated with elevating LDL (bad) cholesterol. Valentine’s Day can be made even more special with dark chocolates made from organic or fairly traded cocoa beans. Like skin care products, the benefits reaped are only as good as the ingredients.

For its ability to nourish the body, dark chocolate is included in The Healing Foods Pyramid developed by the Integrative Medicine Department at the University of Michigan. They recommend eating up to 7 ounces a week or 1 ounce per day. Other researchers found that dark chocolate is a richer source of polyphenols and flavanols than fruit juice. Flavonols are clinically proven to help protect skin from sunburn and other damage caused by UV rays. Cocoa can even reduce stress hormones. Less stress means less collagen breakdown and less wrinkles.

You may be wondering whether milk chocolate or white chocolate contain the same benefits. No, they don’t. Because milk binds to antioxidants in chocolate the health benefits are cancelled. So forget the chocolate milk and hot cocoa as a dark chocolate substitute. For the same reason, avoid drinking milk while eating dark chocolate.  White chocolate doesn’t contain cocoa solids so it won’t include the antioxidant benefit either.

If your sweetie doesn’t present you with a box of dark chocolates, you can still order a delicious dessert of fruit dipped in melted dark chocolate after a romantic meal at your favorite restaurant. If you don’t get chocolates or a meal, relax at home with a jar of YASOU hydrating body cream. You’re skin will love it.  (photo of chocolate: Lisa Folios/pexels)

Love and Skin Care: What’s It All About

REPOST

To express love you could write a poem, play a heart rendering song, attend a candlelit dinner, pick up roses, or wrap a box of jewelry. However you do it, to love and be loved is a pleasure that supports healthy skin. Plant kisses, offer a massage,  or sit in the back at a romantic movie. Feel-good emotions help reduce stress and build skin cell immunity. Indulge yourself.

 

Love lets you face the world

When your skin looks and feels good you are ready to face the world. Caring for your skin is a way of expressing self love. Healthy skin is one path our bodies and brains use to indicate what’s stirring inside. When you love the skin you’re in, it shows.

 

Let the glow grow

Love can help you get your glow on. A happy, joyful person releases endorphins causing increased blood flow that may manifest as skin glow. Endorphins spread like confetti from your brain when it’s trying to keep pain and stress at bay. Some lovely ways to increase endorphins are to eat, laugh, make love, listen to music, drink, exercise with others and sniff lavender.

 

Love reduces stress

Self-care is important for healthy skin. Desire lights our fire but stress, sadness and anger can cause inflammation that leads to skin disruptions such as acne and rosacea. Happiness and joy reduce inflammation through chemical reactions that include endorphins and neurotransmitters. Stress increases cortisol levels and inhibits enzymes responsible for the healthy production of collagen and elastin.

 

Love is mindful

The nerve endings in skin are continually communicating with the brain. If you or your significant other experience chronic stress or disturbing emotional issues it may show up on the skin. The mind-skin connection was reported years ago in Harvard Health Publications, Women’s Health Watch. Consider the blush, if you question the skin’s ability to decipher emotions.

 

Love makes skin stronger

Positive emotions increase skin cell immunity. Strong skin cells are less prone to infection and quicken the skin’s ability to heal. Skin tells a story of how we cope, love, fear, desire and explore. It shows what we’ve been through and how we choose to live life.

A team of researches from Duke University recently demonstrated how emotions can be “seen” using a functional MRI scan. While fascinating, it’s more wonderful to see joy in real life on the faces and in the arms of our loved ones. Our skin allows us to touch and feel. Nurture your skin with natural moisturizing skin cream and you’ll be ready for all that love has to offer.

Share the love and make it special this Valentine’s Day with YASOU natural skin care.

YASOU Blog Topics For 2019

Happy 2019! We hope you had wonderful holidays. It’s a new year with new goals and ambitions. Here at YASOU Skin Care we are excited and energized to present skin care posts that educate and entertain.  We want to bring you the best and most current topics in natural skin care. We have a lot to talk about! Here are just some of the topics we will cover in this blog during 2019.

Individual Beauty Begins with Your Skin. Whatever you put on it, whatever color it is, nobody’s skin is the same as yours. It’s like a map showing contours, origins, physical and cultural features that reveal the uniqueness of you. Not only where you’ve been, but where you’re going.

Social Media Devas Don’t Look Good All The time. People are taking photos and sharing them on social media 24 hours a day. Those who are confident in who they are and what they look like are posting pics that reflect real life, not magazine covers. Mastering a natural skin care look can rid you of the demand for glamour shots with something more real. When you feel good, you look good.

+MORE.   Take a look at our info graphic for more subjects we plan on talking about this year. Make sure you register for our newsletter so you can stay informed about our newest promotions, events, sales and giveaways. Looking forward to 2019 with you.

YASOU!

REPOST: Mary Greenwell: How To Make Up Hooded Eyes

Hello everyone,

As I am aging I am finding that the skin on my eye lids have become super sensitive, maybe you are as well. The skin in this area is known to be the thinnest on the entire body, along with our lips. I am also finding that I need to relearn how to apply my eye make up because I’m getting a bit of what is called “hooded eyes”.  My eyes seem smaller and I’m not fond of this. So, I decided to reach out and booked an appointment with Bridgett the owner of Odalisque Beauty Apothecary, to re-teach me how to apply my eye make up correctly, to achieve my new needs.

Bridgett passed this video on to watch before my appointment and it’s so informative that I thought I’d pass it on to you. I hope you find it useful.

Thank you Bridgett and thank you Mary Greenwell for this informative and helpful video that also talks about skin sensitivities and other issues.

Enjoy!

Theodora Ntovas
founder of YASOU skin care

101 Information On Adult Acne and Your Skin

As an adult I thought I would out grow acne but I didn’t. I suffer from Cystic Acne  which is noted on the information graphic below as Cyst/Nodule.  It is the most severe form of acne because it is very deep rooted in the inner layers of the skin and the nodules are painful.  I started seeing a dermatologist in my youth around 16 years old and still visit them today.   I have educated myself and have learned acne is triggered differently for each person (see the section “Types” on the infographic). For example, my acne stems from stress and hormones.  I have also learned how to treat my acne, using my dermatological products and my Greek inspired YASOU skin care products as a total skin care regime. Today I am proud to say my skin has never looked healthier.

The one thing I can pass on to you is that cleaning your skin every day and being gentle to it is very important. You can find some great DIY cleansers and information in the article “Keep Your Skin Clean With DIY Natural Skin Cleansers.”  I also came across the infographic below and thought it was informative, offering basic information that could be helpful, so please take a look.  The more information you have about adult acne, the wiser you will be in learning how to treat it and care for your skin.  Please drop us a line at terry@yasouskincare.com with any tips or information on adult acne that would be beneficial to pass on to others.  YASOU!

(infographic courtesy of Besskincare.com)

 

 

 

Active Bodies Need an Active Skin Care Routine

During the course of a week, healthy adults should be getting a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity, as well as doing strength training for all major muscle groups at least twice according to recommendations by the Department of Health and Human Services. Making exercise a part of your daily routine supports not only cardiovascular health, but your skin too. Increased blood flow naturally nourishes skin cells, provides oxygen and carries away waste. Prepping skin before and after exercise will support this natural process and enhance the overall look of your skin.

 

Cleanse skin before and after exercise

Whether you get moving in the morning or evening, cleanse your face before your exercise regimen begins. Many natural DIY face wipes can be easily made at home and transported in your bag. Starting your workout with a fresh face means removing makeup, especially heavy foundation. Your skin’s pores open up while sweating and allow it to breathe. With makeup on, sweat and oil may clog the pores. That said, makeup on the eyes and lip are okay. For those who never leave home without wearing a foundation, a light weight tinted moisturizer will work. It helps your skin retain water.

Wash your hands before and after a workout. Bacteria is left on workout machines as well as other gym equipment including matts. Avoid touching your face while exercising. At a gym, always use clean towels after washing your face and hands.

Post workout, wash your face to remove oil, toxins and sweat. Your fresh face may be a bit rosy because of increased blood flow. You may even see a natural glow.

 

Hydrate skin before and after exercise

Skin loses water through evaporation. Dehydrated skin causes premature death for skin cells and increases wrinkles. Drinking fluids is important for the body but research shows a more efficient way to hydrate the skin is through a topical moisturizer. Adding a hydrating body cream and hand cream before working out helps skin retain water. Applying moisturizer after exercise restores water levels in skin.

Misting can help but only if you apply a moisturizer to seal the mist in. Without a moisturizer, misting will draw water out and dehydrate the skin.

 

Protect skin during outdoor exercise

Apply a light moisturizer and protect your skin from sun rays with a sunscreen of at least SPF 30. Tie your hair back and away from your face. Avoid headbands which can trap skin oils and bacteria while sweating. Don’t apply hair products that can drip onto your face and clog pores.

 

Workout clothing that’s good for the skin

Wear breathable, moisture wicking clothing. These clothes help evaporate sweat away from the skin and help regulate body temperature. They are good especially for acne prone or oily skin. Dark color dyes and synthetic fibers can irritant skin. Loose fitting clothes can irritate the skin because it rubs against the skin while you’re in motion. Natural fabrics are best.

Most fabrics are treated with chemicals so wash them before wearing. Turn workout clothes inside out when washing. Inside is where workout clothes hold sweat, dead skin cells and oil.  Fabric softeners tend to lock in odors and damage stretchy fabrics so avoid using them. Air dry clothes outside if possible. Sunshine has anti-bacterial properties, gives a fresh smell, doesn’t shrink clothes and is energy efficient.

Change out of active wear within 30 minutes, shower, and let skin breathe. Don’t forget to apply your favorite luxe wellness hydrating body cream and vegan hand cream.

Finally, at least once a week, take time to notice and admire your skin in the mirror. Commend yourself for keeping your skin healthy and vibrant.