Skin care fun facts, infographics, skin care word searches and topics that are interesting, informative and quirky.

Happy Thanksgiving from YASOU natural skin care

I love Thanksgiving! It’s the only holiday where I really reflect on my gratitude.  This internal acknowledgement does something to me in a deeper way than outward forms of expression.

Like many people I am thankful for my health, my family and friends but also for all of you who have supported our all-natural, luxe wellness, skin care products!

 

I am also thankful for where facts and humor can take us. With that in mind here are some fun Thanksgiving facts I came across and want to share with you.

 

  1. Historians have no record of turkey being eaten at the first Thanksgiving.The first Thanksgiving Day feast happened in 1621 with three whole days dedicated to the celebration. It is believed that ducks, geese, venison, oysters, lobster, eel, fish, pumpkins and cranberries were the actual stars of the festivities, served by the English settlers and Native Americans.

 

  1. “Jingle Bells” was originally a Thanksgiving Day song.Originally, Jingle Bells was an 1857 song titled “One Horse Open Sleigh” and its composer, James Pierpont, intended it to be a Thanksgiving Day song. Instead, it became so popular around December 25, that in 1859 the title was changed to “Jingle Bells” and the rest is history!

 

  1. President George H. W. Bush was the first to pardon a turkey.In 1989, the 42nd president pardoned the first turkey ever after noticing the 50-pound bird looked a little antsy at his official Thanksgiving proclamation.
    Since then, every president has upheld the tradition and a few of the turkeys have gone on to serve a different purpose. Thank you, President George H. W. Bush!

 

  1. There are three small towns in the United States named after this bird.They are Turkey, Texas; Turkey, North Carolina; and Turkey Creek, Louisiana. There are also two townships in Pennsylvania called
    Upper Turkeyfoot and Lower Turkeyfoot.

 

  1. Thanksgiving leftovers inspired the first-ever TV dinner.In 1953, the TV-dinner company Swanson overestimated the demand for turkey by over 260 tons, (according to Smithsonian Magazine).  The owners of the company had no idea what to do with all the leftovers and enlisted the help of company salesman Gerry Thomas. Taking inspiration from airplane meals, Thomas ordered 5,000 aluminum trays, loaded them with the turkey leftovers and created the first TV dinner.

 

The definition of Thanksgiving per Wikipedia is: A day of giving thanks and sacrifice for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year.

 

May your harvest be bountiful, full of all the rewards you worked hard for and deserve.  Wishing all of you a very Happy Thanksgiving. YASOU!

What Native Americans Could Have Taught Pilgrims About Skin Care

Jamestown colonist John Smith observed that Powhatan Indians in Virginia followed a daily regime of bathing in waterways each morning before the sun appeared. They would then make an offering to the sun spirit and return home for breakfast. In cleansing every day and eating healthy foods the Native Americans had established a natural skin care routine. One the Pilgrims seemed to have ignored.

 

When the pilgrims arrived at Plymouth, they bathed only a few times a year. They believed the water to be unhealthy. According to Kathleen M Brown, author of Foul Bodies, pilgrims believed the textiles they wore would absorb dirt and body sweat. They wrongly associated moral and spiritual purity with physical cleanliness. Half of the Mayflower occupants died within the first two months of their arrival, mostly to contagious disease while still aboard the ship.

 

In their villages, Native American tribes built sweat lodges near a waterway. About eight people, one of whom was a healer, would enter the lodge once it was heated. A central hearth was lined with bark and large hot stones. The healer would drip droplets of water on the stones creating steam and then sprinkle water on the people inside the lodge. They would remain in the lodge’s intense heat for as long as they could, then rushed out and plunged their bodies into the waterway nearby. Such rituals were used to heal, give thanks, and purify the mind and body.

 

Heat increases the blood flow at the surface of the skin and may help with some skin disorders. Today, celebrities including Gwyneth Paltrow, Selena Gomez, and Demi Moore are reportedly visiting urban sweat lodges that use electric blankets and infrared technology to raise their body temperature to create a radiant skin glow. Doctors will say that sweating detoxifies the skin and body in a natural way. So, the native Americans were definitely on to something. Sweat actually rids the skin of dirt and impurities, much more efficiently than textiles ever will. However, it is important to build up a heat tolerance and drink plenty of water to replenish the body if you want to benefit from a sweat lodge or sauna experience.

 

Native Americans brushed their teeth with charcoal from the fire, using a finger to rub the teeth, and then rinsed with water. They had no soaps or disinfectants. They turned to plants to moisturize and heal their skin. They ground up corn to cleanse and exfoliate their skin. Berries from evergreen shrubs were used in teas. They found roots’ inner stems could be dried and powdered to act as rubs for the face during cold winter months. Chapped skin was treated with a grass wash. Wild native plants contained essential oils that released scents and soothed skin.

 

The Wampanoag Indians in Plymouth ate fowl, fish, nuts and cranberries – all organic. Their diet was high in protein with low sodium and no fat. Some tribe members lived to be 100 years old. They believed all living beings are related and that we are all equal. They held celebrations throughout the seasons including New Year in the spring, strawberries and corn in the summer; cranberries in the fall, and the solstice in winter.

 

In October of 1621 in southeastern Massachusetts, 90 Wampanoag Indians and 53 Pilgrims gathered to celebrate the settlers’ first harvest. Under the candlelight, the good feelings from fellowship were sure to make their skin glow. A modern-day member of the Wampanoag tribe, Randy Joseph, expressed a thought we can all learn from: “The great Creator who created all life gave us all that we needed to live a healthy life. In return, we give thanks every day.”

Scary Skin Care Stories. . . Halloween Makeup Removal Tips

Halloween has arrived and I’ve been hearing some scary skin care stories. Don’t try to trick your skin, treat it well and avoid mistakes as described in these tales.

 

Horrifying breakouts from heavy makeup

A friend’s teenage daughter left her Halloween makeup on all night and woke up with a shiny, red, bumpy face. Her mom created a scrub using two teaspoons of baking soda and one teaspoon of water to cleanse and exfoliate her daughter’s skin. Oily, heavy makeup left on the skinmixes with dead skincells to clog pores, trapping bacteriainside and causing acne. Halloween face makeup is usually oil-based, heavier and thicker than every day makeup so don’t get spooked by clogged pores. While makeup may be a safer alternative to wearing a Halloween mask, don’t forget to cleanse well before the witching hour and don’t go to bed without washing your face no matter how much fun you’ve had!

 

Bacteria communities

Here’s a creepy, yet healthy discovery made by researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute. Our skin is crawling with hundreds of kinds of bacteria in moist creases behind our ears and under our neck, to the webs of our toes, the navel and the fold between our eyes. Dry areas of the skin also contain bacteria, but it is less diverse. “Our results underscore that skin is home to vibrant communities of microbial life, which may significantly influence our health,” said researcher Elizabeth A. Grice. Another harmless, but unsettling reality is that microscopic mites graze on oils, skin cells and other microbes on our face.   This is a good reason we recommend you prep your skin for Halloween by cleansing, moisturizing well and using a primer before applying your Halloween make-up.

 

Face mask mistakes

If you decide to apply a facial mask, make sure your young children are away or asleep. A friend covered her face with a green, organic facial mask to refresh her skin. When her two-year old son saw her, he screamed and ran away in fear of not knowing what had happened to his mother’s face. She had to wash off the expensive mask in order to calm him down.  As a final step to cleansing your skin after removing your Halloween makeup especially for dry or sensitive skin we recommend applying a hydrating, calming mask followed by a vegan night moisturizer.

 

Check Your Skin Care and Makeup Labels

After finding an old jar of moisturizer in her bathroom, a woman started using it again only to find her skin inflamed with sensations of burning and irritation. If you notice any change in your product’s texture, color, or smell throw it away.  For Halloween makeup invest in some professional theatre-level makeup instead of the cheap options at the local drug store this can help you avoid the possibility of a nightmare scenario for your skin.

 

Check your labels for harmful ingredients such as heavy metals, formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers and petrolatum. Look for comedogenic ingredients like, acetylated lanolin, D&C red and octyl stearate, as well as, occlusive ingredients to name a few and say no thank you!

 

Dirty, yucky makeup brushes

Perhaps the most often committed skin sin is not cleaning your makeup brushes. Unwashed makeup brushes can become a breeding ground for dirt and bad bacteria that causes breakouts in the skin.  Rashes, blisters, irritation, clogged pores and other skin ailments can occur when using dirty makeup brushes. A friend who admitted to not cleaning her brushes regularly, saw a small cyst forming on her face. She thought it would go away, but years later the bump remains on her face. Dirt also diminishes the performance of your brushes. What was once blending can appear as streaks making makeup application a hassle.  For Halloween we suggest purchasing brushes that you can dispose after usage, let them go!

 

Alternative costumes

Instead of heavy makeup costumes think of Halloween characters or concepts that do not involve a great deal of makeup.  Some ideas Cat woman, Wednesday Addams, Cousin It, Men in Black, paper doll costume and Miss Universe to name a few.  Think of concepts that may involve building or creating items, using clothes or wigs to enhance your Halloween costume!

 

Don’t be haunted by these scary skin care stories. Love your skin, use the tips and these potential skincare nightmares will turn into sweet dreams.

(image: Wendelin Jacober/pexels)

YASOU Skin Care Word Search

We decided to have some fun and created a skin care word search for your amusement.  How many skin care terms can you find.  All you have to do is print the graphic, grab some juice or coffee and give it a go.  All the terms for you to find are listed on the right hand side so you can cross them off as you find them.  Hope you enjoy and maybe learn a new term or two.

 

How Skin Reflects Your Individuality

 

“I think the reward for conformity is that everyone likes you except yourself.”
― Rita Mae Brown

 

One of our most important natural assets that evolution has given us is our skin. Skin protects, insulates, and regulates our body. Each body contains its own genetic and geographic remnants. What your skin looks like reflects your individuality in multiple ways. Sometimes the look is made through choices and some are ingrained.  Either way, let your skin tell the story of who you are.

 

Skin as identifier
Your skin can literally identify who you are. Your fingerprints are unique to you. The thin epidermis layer of skin on your fingers begins to form while still in your mother’s womb. When a baby starts using fingers to touch, the pressure interaction with surfaces starts to form faint “friction ridges.” If burned or cut, fingerprints will grow back over time exactly as they were. Skin elasticity does decrease as we age so fingerprint ridges are less prominent in seniors.

Skin also contains personalized bacterial communities. What we touch leaves an imprint on an object’s surface. Research studies show that skin-associated bacteria can be recovered from surfaces. It can be used to differentiate objects handled by different individuals. Our skin actually leaves a trail of our personal touch.

 

Beauty diversified
At the age of 20 French-American model Maeva Giani Marshall had a stroke and was treated for kidney problems that caused hyperpigmentation on her face. The burn marks from medication faded into dark smudged like freckles. Of her look, she says: “I want to show people that you’re allowed to be different and don’t have to change for anyone.”

When Salem Mitchell posted selfies on her twitter account people made fun of her freckles. But her speckled tawny brown skin and personal confidence grabbed the attention of Ford Models Agency, where she is now signed.

Women of the Middle Ages used ointments, dyes, and cosmetics to hide what they considered skin flaws, including freckles. They wanted pale skin which was associated with high status. This goes to a point art critic Jerry Saltz made recently in his article How to Be an Artist for New York magazine: “Don’t be reined in by other people’s definition of skill or beauty or be boxed in by what is supposedly high or low.”

Birth marks, scars, and skin disease such as vitiligo all tell a story of who you are. Rather than diminishing your look it can enhance by emphasizing your individuality. Consider it a twist on conventional beauty.

 

Skin Color and adaptation
The color of your skin tells its own story of geography and sun exposure. Through the ages skin has adapted to conditions. When humans started walking on two legs in Africa, they lost much of their body hair and their skin increased the number of sweat glands to keep them cool in a hot climate. Their skin produced a lot of melanin to keep skin dark, acting as a natural sunscreen against the sun’s harsh UV rays.

A person’s skin color (melanin found in skin cells) is related to their ancestry and heritage. When humans moved to milder cooler climates where UV rays were less strong, the skin adapted to a paler color to better absorb Vitamin D from sun rays and folic acid. Melanin content varies by gender and age and differs on body parts as well. Consider the palms of your hands and feet.

 

Skin and emotion
Skin blushes, gets goosebumps and regulates temperature according to how we are feeling. Some professional training companies analyze a person’s emotional reactions to situations by reading their skin temperature. Skin may help you to understand your own emotional intelligence. A study on facial thermal response measured skin temperature at the tip of the nose when showing positive, neutral and negative pictures to participants. The skin temperature remained the same when participants were shown the neutral picture but changed to warmer when viewing the positive and cooler when viewing the negative pictures. It seems the skin of your nose knows.

Being one of your most important natural assets, protect and nurture your skin. Let your skin reflect your individuality and prove you’re one of a kind.

(photo: Milena Fotografia/pexels)

Love and Skin Care: What’s It All About

REPOST

To express love you could write a poem, play a heart rendering song, attend a candlelit dinner, pick up roses, or wrap a box of jewelry. However you do it, to love and be loved is a pleasure that supports healthy skin. Plant kisses, offer a massage,  or sit in the back at a romantic movie. Feel-good emotions help reduce stress and build skin cell immunity. Indulge yourself.

 

Love lets you face the world

When your skin looks and feels good you are ready to face the world. Caring for your skin is a way of expressing self love. Healthy skin is one path our bodies and brains use to indicate what’s stirring inside. When you love the skin you’re in, it shows.

 

Let the glow grow

Love can help you get your glow on. A happy, joyful person releases endorphins causing increased blood flow that may manifest as skin glow. Endorphins spread like confetti from your brain when it’s trying to keep pain and stress at bay. Some lovely ways to increase endorphins are to eat, laugh, make love, listen to music, drink, exercise with others and sniff lavender.

 

Love reduces stress

Self-care is important for healthy skin. Desire lights our fire but stress, sadness and anger can cause inflammation that leads to skin disruptions such as acne and rosacea. Happiness and joy reduce inflammation through chemical reactions that include endorphins and neurotransmitters. Stress increases cortisol levels and inhibits enzymes responsible for the healthy production of collagen and elastin.

 

Love is mindful

The nerve endings in skin are continually communicating with the brain. If you or your significant other experience chronic stress or disturbing emotional issues it may show up on the skin. The mind-skin connection was reported years ago in Harvard Health Publications, Women’s Health Watch. Consider the blush, if you question the skin’s ability to decipher emotions.

 

Love makes skin stronger

Positive emotions increase skin cell immunity. Strong skin cells are less prone to infection and quicken the skin’s ability to heal. Skin tells a story of how we cope, love, fear, desire and explore. It shows what we’ve been through and how we choose to live life.

A team of researches from Duke University recently demonstrated how emotions can be “seen” using a functional MRI scan. While fascinating, it’s more wonderful to see joy in real life on the faces and in the arms of our loved ones. Our skin allows us to touch and feel. Nurture your skin with natural moisturizing skin cream and you’ll be ready for all that love has to offer.

Share the love and make it special this Valentine’s Day with YASOU natural skin care.

YASOU Blog Topics For 2019

Happy 2019! We hope you had wonderful holidays. It’s a new year with new goals and ambitions. Here at YASOU Skin Care we are excited and energized to present skin care posts that educate and entertain.  We want to bring you the best and most current topics in natural skin care. We have a lot to talk about! Here are just some of the topics we will cover in this blog during 2019.

Individual Beauty Begins with Your Skin. Whatever you put on it, whatever color it is, nobody’s skin is the same as yours. It’s like a map showing contours, origins, physical and cultural features that reveal the uniqueness of you. Not only where you’ve been, but where you’re going.

Social Media Devas Don’t Look Good All The time. People are taking photos and sharing them on social media 24 hours a day. Those who are confident in who they are and what they look like are posting pics that reflect real life, not magazine covers. Mastering a natural skin care look can rid you of the demand for glamour shots with something more real. When you feel good, you look good.

+MORE.   Take a look at our info graphic for more subjects we plan on talking about this year. Make sure you register for our newsletter so you can stay informed about our newest promotions, events, sales and giveaways. Looking forward to 2019 with you.

YASOU!

Don’t Just Give a Gift, Present It

Estheticians know their customers want change not only in an improved physical appearance but also in their confidence or self-esteem. It’s more than just a look, the feel is important. A face, hands or body become a canvas. A hydrating body cream soothes. A vegan hand cream is pure. Include touch during your gift giving moment. It may be a kiss, hug, handshake or pat on the back. Touch always adds intimacy.  

How can you bring more joy to your gift giving experience? Employ thoughtful aesthetics and authentic gestures to your gift giving moment. We may venture to multiple shops looking for the perfect gift, but how much thought do we give to the moment when a gift is given? This moment could be the beginning of a new tradition or a once only event. The idea is to surprise, engage and intrigue. In other words, don’t just give a gift, present it. Make your gift giving moment memorable. Here are some ideas from professions that rely on aesthetics and authentic gestures to create memorable moments. 

To enhance a diner’s experience chefs know they must prepare a delicious meal, but they also need to present it well. For example, they choose the right size and color of plate to serve the food. They don’t overcrowd the plate or add too many sizes, textures and shapes. These decisions add to the diner’s delight. If your gift has color in it, choose a wrapping paper with a similar or complementary color. Fit the box size to the gift size.  

Designers use their creativity to express ideas in an original way. Composition is key. They look at multiple elements and bring them together. When presenting a gift, design the moment in a way that only you can. What will you be wearing when you give the gift? What scent is in the room? Is music playing? What about the lighting – candles or twinkling tree lights?

Writers know the power of story. When giving a gift offer a short backstory – why you think they would like it, where you got it from, why you want them to have it. Offer a complement that is heart-felt and revealing. It should tell the person something you adore about them while also revealing something about you and your relationship to that person. For example: “Every time you (do whatever), it reminds me of what a special person you are.”

This season YASOU skin care added all of the elements above to create a special skin care gift package that contains a 8oz hydrating body cream aroma free with two hand crafted Lavender, Bergamot bath bombs gift wrapped that we think will be appreciated by all gift givers as well as those receiving your gift. Moments are what make our life beautiful and memorable. Enjoy yours. Happy holidays!

Scary Skin Care Stories

Halloween is around the corner and I’ve been hearing some scary skin care stories. Don’t try to trick your skin, treat it well and avoid mistakes as described in these tales.

Horrifying breakouts from heavy makeup
A friend’s teenage daughter left her Halloween makeup on all night and woke up with a shiny, red, bumpy face. Her mom created a scrub using two teaspoons of baking soda and one teaspoon of water to cleanse and exfoliate her daughter’s skin. Oily, heavy makeup left on the skinmixes with dead skincells to clog pores, trapping bacteriainside and causing acne. Halloween face makeup is usually oil-based, heavier and thicker than every day makeup so don’t get spooked by clogged pores. While makeup may be a safer alternative to wearing a Halloween mask, don’t forget to cleanse well when the witching hour comes.

Bacteria communities
Here’s a creepy, yet healthy discovery made by researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute. Our skin is crawling with hundreds of kinds of bacteria in moist creases behind our ears and under our neck, to the webs of our toes, the navel and the fold between our eyes. Dry areas of the skin also contain bacteria, but it is less diverse. “Our results underscore that skin is home to vibrant communities of microbial life, which may significantly influence our health,” said researcher Elizabeth A. Grice. Another harmless, but unsettling reality is that microscopic mites graze on oils, skin cells and other microbes on our face.

Face mask mistakes
If you decide to apply a facial mask, make sure your young children are away or asleep. A friend covered her face with a green, organic facial mask to refresh her skin. When her two-year old son saw her, he screamed and ran away in fear of not knowing what had happened to his mother’s face. She had to wash off the expensive mask in order to calm him down.

Skin care products gone bad
After finding an old jar of moisturizer in her bathroom, a woman started using it again only to find her skin inflamed with sensations of burning and irritation. If you notice any change in your product’s texture, color, or smell throw it away. Sunscreen shelf life is about two years. Shampoo lasts for years if you keep the bottle closed. The same holds true for soaps if they remain in their packaging before use. Quality moisturizers and serums can last up to two years. Always apply with clean hands and fingers to avoid spreading infection.

Also, people who neglect or misread skin care product instructions risk skin hazards including discoloration or irritation. It’s always important to read the instructions on how to use all products properly. Harsh ingredients used incorrectly can result in multiple skin nightmares.

Dirty, yucky makeup brushes
Perhaps the most often committed skin sin is not cleaning your makeup brushes. Unwashed makeup brushes can become a breeding ground for dirt and bad bacteria that causes breakouts in the skin.  Rashes, blisters, irritation, clogged pores and other skin ailments can occur when using dirty makeup brushes. A friend who admitted to not cleaning her brushes regularly, saw a small cyst forming on her face. She thought it would go away, but years later the bump remains on her face. Dirt also diminishes the performance of your brushes. What was once blending can appear as streaks making makeup application a hassle.

An unlikely culprit
A pillow case can serve as a great ghost costume or candy collector but while sleepingplacing your face directly on the pillow case causes friction on the skin which can lead to wrinkles and create forehead lines. Facedown sleepers may experience more skin breakouts. That’s because dirt and oil from the pillow and grease from your hair is in contact with the skin. Sleep on your back with your head elevated a bit. Flat sleepers may experience puffy eyes due to fluid buildup. Wash your sheets and pillow cases at least once a week to avoid impurities on your skin. Apply a hydrating body cream. Also, remember to apply a hydrating night cream on your face to moisturize your skin and support your body’s natural night time renewal processes.

Don’t be haunted by these scary skin care stories. Love your skin and these nightmares will turn into sweet dreams.

Skin, The Sense of Touch and More.

 

“A touch isn’t just a touch. It’s a kiss from the soul, onto the skin” . . . .

The words above made me think about how our skin interprets the sense of touch.  It’s mind-boggling if you think deeply into it. One thing I realized is that our skin’s health is so much more than addressing dry skin or aging. It’s deeper than that.

Our skin is the door to feeling touch. How?

RECEPTORS: Your skin has many types of receptors in your body, they are grouped in three categories 1) Thermoreceptors, that do what?  2) Nociceptors, that do what? and 3) Mechanoreceptors, that do what?

Each receptor is a structure that gathers information from the environment. That data is then changed into a signal that can be understood by your nervous system.  The receptors that let the body sense touch are located in the top layers of the skin (the dermis and epidermis). They are small in size and collect super accurate information when touched.  These receptors in the skin allow a person to feel sensations like pressure, pain, temperature and physical change like an object pressing firmly or just brushing against the skin. And of course. . .

Can these receptors transmit emotions and love? Well, there are two touch systems 1) discriminative touch and 2) emotional.  You can do some research to learn more about them if you like. What I have learned from my research is that touch can communicate tenderness, compassion, anger, love, gratitude, happiness and fear within mere seconds. Touch is a fundamental human need from the time we are born and essential for physical, emotional and social health and it all starts with your skin!

The importance of skin health becomes more visible as we age.  When we age our sense of touch starts to deteriorate because our skin is aging.  Aging skin becomes thinner, more fragile, and starts losing the protective fat layer giving an aging person skin disorders such as … Aging can affect the receptors and how they communicate. Our sense of touch, pressure, vibration and temperature control start to diminish.

Taking care of your skin at a younger age can keep it healthier effecting your health and happiness as you age.  Take the time to nurture your skin and celebrate your own sense of touch. Make it a part of your daily regime and lifestyle.

In her poem “A touch isn’t just a touch” Sarah L. Harvey writes about touch:  “It’s the sensation of one’s soul, whispering to one’s fingertips” Think about how touch influences your day.