Fabrics Your Skin Will Love

Materials that we choose to wear effect the health of our skin and well being, as well as our stance on sustainability and living a cruelty free lifestyle! I was so excited to research this subject and report my findings to you. Some materials we will be discussing are plant based and vegan, others are not. We want to give you choices of materials that we found interesting and good for your skin, giving you information that can help you make better choices for your lifestyle and needs. Overall, we believe natural fabrics are always the best choice for your skin and health.

 

Natural materials:

 

  1. Organic Cotton (GOT cotton). GOT is a certification that the cotton is organic. Organic cotton minimizes environmental impact by removing the use of cancer-causing pesticides and other chemicals in the production process. Instead it focuses on a holistic process that puts sustainability first. Cotton is also better for your body – being a natural fiber, it is very breathable, hypoallergenic, natural, vegan and cruelty-free

    NOTE: When buying products made of cotton, look out for certified organic labeling, and make sure it isn’t a blend fabric.

 

  1. Linen. Linen is an ancient sustainable fabric made from the stem of the flax plant. It is super durable and becomes softer and stronger the more that it is used. It also warms you in winter and cools you in warmer weather.It is natural, vegan and cruelty-free.

 

  1. Pinatex (Pineapple Leather). The leaves of the pineapple plant have recently become one of the most sustainable vegan leather alternatives on the market. This material is made from pineapple leaf fiber. It’s a new, innovative fabric conceptualized by Ananas Anam. It is natural, vegan and biodegradable.

 

  1. Upcycled Leather. By employing the practice of upcycling, we avoid creating new materials which minimizes waste and saves natural resources such as energy and water. Leather is a durable, strong, breathable, eco-friendly material that lasts forever and gets better within time.  If you choose not to endorse animal products, there are some great alternative leather options that are made from plants such as cork and pineapple.

 

  1. Lyocell. This material is made from wood pulp. It is a great substitute for silk. It’s soft and drapes well. It can be washed, dyed and even woven to mimic the qualities of suede, leather, moleskin or wool. Lycocell keeps the skin warm in cooler weather and cool in warmer weather. It is also, eco-friendly, vegan, biodegradable, highly absorbent and an antibacterial fabric that is safe for sensitive skin.It’s just a great fabric!

 

  1. 100% Pure Silk. Silk is a natural fiber, but it is not vegan. It is extremely soft, non-irritate to even the most sensitive skin, free of any chemicals, hypoallergenic, decreases skin’s loss of moisture, and promotes rejuvenation of the skin. Thus it helps prevent some effects of aging, relieves dry, flaky skin conditions by locking moisture in and ensuring it stays on the skin. Silk keeps you cool on hot days and warm on cold ones. It is highly absorbent, dries fast and is extremely strong.

 

  1. SeaCell (Seaweed). Dried seaweed is crushed coarsely, ground, and simultaneously introduced into cellulose fiber, from which materials for a wide variety of textiles, known as SeaCell, are manufactured. Brown algae is used in this material and supposedly activates cell regeneration, re-mineralizes skin, limits inflammation, soothes itchiness and detoxifies the body. The porous structure of the SeaCell textile fibers promotes humidity intake and release, which keeps you warm in the winter and cool in the summer.

 

  1. Hemp. We just couldn’t leave this one out. These days it’s everywhere and in everything (at least some form of it). Hemp comes from the stem of the plant. It is one of the oldest fibers in the world, and one of the most sustainable fabrics! It is similar to linen in feel and breathability, keeping you warm in winter and cool in summer and becomes softer with time. It is also a highly UV-resistant fabric, so it’s great for beachwear.

    NOTE: Make sure natural dyes are used when purchasing hemp clothing to negate the detrimental effects of harsh chemical dyes on people and plane.

 

Image: Jack Reigate | pexels

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