Discussions, topics, research on overal skin care using natural, clean, vegan, cruelty-free, non-toxic, gluten-free, unisex ingredients, DIY concoctions, or treatments.

Natural Skin Care Through the Ages

The use of natural ingredients in skin care has an enduring history throughout the ages. Influenced by culture, geography and of course aesthetics you may be surprised at what natural skin care remedies of yesteryear have in common with today’s skin care products. Relying on natural ingredients begins with the Egyptians and has evolved to the present day. Such knowledge can take your skin care into the next decade with confidence.

 

Ancient times

Ancient Egyptians created do-it-yourself remedies consisting of sesame, castor and moringa oils to diminish wrinkles. They cleansed their skin with a soapy paste using bentonite clay and olive oil, a combination still sold today in some soaps and face mask products. The most famous of Egyptian women, Cleopatra, was said to have used these to preserve her beautiful skin.

 

The ancient Greeks looked no further than fresh berry bushes, olive trees and honeybees to mix, mash and extract surrounding bounties to create oils and pastes with anti-aging and hydration properties.

 

Middle ages

During Medieval times and the Renaissance years in Europe smooth, white skin was highly praised. Women turned to herbs, seeds, and flowers for their face masks and sported hats to shade their skin from the sun. Saunas and sweat cleansing came into vogue for both men and women.

 

Later, in the 1800s the white porcelain doll look continued to be pursued by using lemon juice to naturally lighten the shade of skin.

 

20th Century change

 

It wasn’t until the 1930s when Coco Chanel returned from a Mediterranean cruise with a glowing bronzed tan that year-round tans became the desired look for skin. Prior to that tanned skin had been associated with field work. Routines for skin care often included ten steps.

 

Cold cream, moisturizers, and sunscreen all became easily accessible in the 1940s. During the 1950s do-it-yourself skin care face masks staged a comeback. Sunbathing was seen as glamorous. Powder compacts reduced skin shine.

 

During the 1960s skin damage from UVB and UVA rays became known, but many did not heed the warnings until decades later. Following the cake mascara psychedelic sixties, the 1970s ushered in a soft, natural look with minimal makeup and organic skin care products that harkened back-to-the earth sentiments. Natural beauty reigned as represented by popular celebrities Goldie Hawn, Ali McGraw, Sissy Spacek and let’s not forget men including Michael Douglas, Dustin Hoffman and John Travolta.

 

The 1980s were the yuppy years when designer names were blazed on clothing. In skin care, anti-aging products with collagen, natural extracts and acne cleansers were introduced. Face scrubs and exfoliation became common in skin care routines. Sculpted, defined features were highlighted. Matte makeup gave skin a natural look.

 

By the 1990s escalating skin cancer concerns brought sunscreen to the forefront and became a regular accompaniment for men and women’s morning skin care routine. Herbal essence shampoo filled shower stalls; body powder and body lotions crowded bathroom cabinets. AHAs – alpha hydroxy acids – were introduced to help diminish fine lines, promote blood flow, brighten and exfoliate skin.

 

21st Century solutions

 

Let’s forget Britney Spear’s body glitter in the 2000s and Victoria Secret’s Love Spell fragrance and move onto natural body butter, cellular face creams, and vegan hand lotions that promote bright healthy skin.

 

The 2020s  will continue to embrace natural, sustainable skin care products. Global diversity has provided an influx from other cultures. The toffee-colored, healthy skin of celebrities such as Alex Rodriguez, Halle Berry and Beyonce is now admired.

 

Serums, refillable products, body and face creams, lip elixirs and other organic skin boosting, skin smoothing remedies harken back to the ages when natural bounties were relied upon. What we know is that there is no one and done process in skin care. It’s an everyday effort. Take your skin care into the next decade with convenient, effective, natural, organic, and sustainable solutions.

 

Cleopatra would be jealous.

 

(image: Saph Photography | Pexels)

Eight Components for Healthy, Glowing Skin

Healthy, beautiful skin comes from the inside out. Good nutrition promotes a healthy glow. So what we put in our bodies is as vital as what we put on our bodies. A healthy skin diet is a diet rich in antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. Research suggests that certain antioxidants such as vitamin C, Vitamin, E, Selenium, and Vitamin A (in the form of beta carotene) nourish and protect the skin to extend it’s youthful appearance.

 

Here are some of the most important components for a healthy skin diet:

 

1)   Vitamin A. Found in low-fat dairy products, and Vitamin A found in fruits and vegetables (beta carotene).  Beta Carotene is a nutrient that is critical for skin health. It is converted to Vitamin A in the body to aid in the growth and repair of body tissue, including your skin.  Best foods for beta carotene are: Sweet Potatoes, Kale, Carrots, Turnip Greens, Mustard Greens, Spinach, Dried Herbs, Butternut Squash, Lettuce (Romaine & Red Leaf) and Collards.

 

2 )  Vitamin C. Naturally found in skin, it is involved in collagen production and protects cells from free radical damage. Vitamin C is destroyed by exposure to sunlight, even when you spend a short amount of time in the sun. It can leave the skin depleted.  That’s why it is important to replenish your skin’s Vitamin C by eating plenty of Vitamin C-rich fruits and vegetables on a regular basis. Best foods for Vitamin C: Red and green hot chili peppers, guavas, bell peppers (all colors), kiwi fruit, fresh herbs (thyme and parsley), bark cauliflower, brussels sprouts, papayas, oranges, tangerines, asparagus and strawberries.

 

3)  Vitamin B3.  is one of the best forms of the B vitamins for your skin. Also known as Niacin, It is a skin-conditioning powerhouse, B3 treats a variety of skin conditions and irritations, including dermatitis, acne, rosacea, eczema, dry and sun-damaged skin, and hyperpigmentation. It’s also a strong anti-aging ingredient and as such, features prominently in skin care products targeted at fine lines and wrinkles. Best foods for Vitamin B3: Turkey, chicken, dairy products, liver, mushrooms, fish, peas, fortified breads and cereals

 

4)  Vitamin E. Protects cell membranes and guards against UV radiation damage. Some research suggests that Vitamin E may work with Vitamin C to provide an extra boost of anti-aging skin protection. Best foods for Vitamin E: Sunflower seeds, paprika & red chili powder, almonds, pine nuts, peanuts, dried herbs (basil & oregano), avocados, dried apricots, pickled green olives, cooked spinach and cooked taro root.

 

5)  Selenium.  An antioxidant mineral that helps safeguard the skin from sun damage. It helps delay wrinkles by protecting the skin’s quality and elasticity. Best foods for Selenium: Nuts (brazil buts), shellfish (oysters, mussels, whelk), brown rice, liver, fish, sunflower seeds, bran (wheat, rice & oat), caviar, bacon and pork chops, mushrooms, lobster, crab, whole wheat pasta and shrimp.

 

6)  Zinc.  Your skin contains six percent of all the Zinc in your body. This mineral is necessary for protecting cell membranes and helping to maintain the collagen that keeps the skin firm. Best foods for Zinc: Oysters, toasted wheat germ, skinless chicken (dark meat), lentils, roasted pumpkins, squash seeds, dried watermelon seeds, dark chocolate, cocoa powder, lean lamb, peanuts and crab.

 

7)  Omega-3 Fatty Acids.  Healthy fats help maintain cell membranes. They are effective barriers allowing water and nutrients in and keeping toxins out. Also known to protect the skin against sun damage. Best foods for Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Chinook salmon, herring, mackerel, halibut, sardines, eggs, soy milk, yogurt, oatmeal, walnuts, brussel sprouts, kale, mint rapeseed oil, cod liver oil, flax seed oil, and olive oil.

 

8)  Hydration.  When hydration comes from pure clear water the skin cells rejoice. Drinking water will help your body flush away toxins and allow the smooth flow of nutrients into the cells.  Cells that are well hydrated are plump and full. This means that the skin will look firmer and clearer (but not “fat”).  Many fruits and vegetables have high water content that contribute to overall hydration. Best foods that are high in water content: Watermelon, strawberries, grapefruit, cantaloupe, peaches, pineapple, raspberries, blueberries and plums, celery, cucumber, iceberg lettuce, tomato, zucchini, mushroom, eggplant and spinach.

 

You may already be practicing a healthy skin diet without even knowing it. This information on how a healthy diet nourishes your skin will give you some more ideas to expand your practice. (Photo: Daria Shevtosova | Pexels).

 

YASOU!

2020 Spring Awakening in Natural Skin Care

The first day of Spring is a month away but I am already seeing glimpses of plant-based beauty that lead me to think it’s time to get our skin out of hibernation, starting now. The year 2020 has brought us exciting avenues for skin care especially in the areas of technology, science and dermatology. Most importantly we are now more than ever looking at our lifestyle and making choices based on what kind of life we want to live. Such choices effect our mental and physical health and thus our skin. What’s on the inside of us effects the outside and vice versus, impacting our bodies in health and appearance.

 

In 2020 we will be looking at more personal and customized skin care practices and routines that influence our sense of well-being, as well as the sustainability of our choices and how it effects our environment.   We subscribe to a full spectrum, holistic approach that is good for us and our environment.

 

Plant Based Beauty is leading and soon to become our norm.  Plant based beauty involves:

 

  1. Vegan and cruelty free products
  2. Well-being of one’s self and our environment.
  3. Customized and personal routines with the aid of technology.
  4. Sustainability, upcycling, zero waste (Blue movement)
  5. Beauty merging with physical and mental health
  6. Old world practices merging with new technology and science

 

Upcycling is all about repurposing items to extend their life so we can avoid more over-flowing landfills. Sustainability is about streamlining packaging using recyclable and biodegradable materials. Or eliminating outside packaging altogether to make so called “naked” products. The Blue Movement is advocating zero waste and supporting environmental ethics that aim to protect the oceans and water supply.

 

We also see old world practices like Ayurveda mixed with new world science and technology. This blend of practices can balance the entire body, support digestive health (gut health) and optimize energy level. Science can help boost skin’s good bacteria, called microbiome or flora, keeping skin healthy and the skin’s barrier intact.

 

The use of technology like digital skin care journals and skin care apps will help us personalize and customize our skin care and wellness practices. Yet, we should always discuss specific skin care concerns with our skin care aestheticians and/or dermatologist for severe cases.

 

I came across two apps that I absolutely LOVE and they are FREE to download.  One is called ThinkDirty. This app identifies any risky or toxic ingredients in any product in their database.  They also offer a monthly beauty box!  You can also visit EWG’s Skin Deep database and plug in any ingredient and receive a rating on any ingredients.  The other app I found is called SunZapp. It can time your UV exposure and send you alerts and reminders when it’s time to reapply sunblock. How cool is that?

 

It’s an exciting time. We are changing our definitions and beliefs on what beauty is and what is important to us to feel happy and look good. Our lifestyle choices and where we spend our money lead that effort.  One thing we know for sure is that plant-based natural skin care is a healthy and sustainable way to always be in style!

(Image: Anna Shivets | Pexels)

 

YASOU.

Greetings from Our YASOU Blog Editor

Welcome to a new decade of living and looking well! Since 2014, I have been editor of the YASOU skin care blog sharing information and advice about natural skin care that we hope you find practical and inspiring. We want to shed light on issues important to those who live and want to live a natural, luxe lifestyle. We wouldn’t exist without all of you, our customers and readers. We don’t have the limelight of big-name skin care companies, but we’re passionate about what we do and always look for ways to better serve you.

Our blog was created to educate, listen, discover and deliver the best information on natural skin care. It allows us to share with you insider knowledge and observations on what works and what doesn’t. The rally in our room always gives a nod to science and the natural world, not hearsay or gossip. Late nights and early mornings at YASOU Natural Skin Care are dedicated to making and promoting a luxe natural skin care line that is effective and sustainable.

In 2020 there’s no place like home to refresh and relax. We will be covering how to enjoy a spa experience at home, how your personality may affect your skin, and sustainable beauty. To all things there is a season including skin care. Seasonal and cultural shifts impact how we care for our skin. Should you stick with the tried and true or take a step in another direction?  Mothers and daughters have a lot to share about this. Will advances in health science work with nature to enhance our skin? How can we tidy up and simplify our skin care? We will be writing about natural skin care myths, legends, lessons and more this year. We love participating in our stories gaining first-hand knowledge and asking questions we and our readers want answers to. We are always looking for ideas that speak to your experience and your sense of beauty.

We like to think of ourselves as courageous little guys who stay fresh and independent. We’re guided by ancestral hand-me-down knowledge, aesthetic and professional integrity. Willing to take a risk, we’ve disrupted established skin care recipes for success in the beauty industry. Our customers are willing to transform, to respect nature’s gifts, to promote dignity for all while also knowing that body and soul need to be soothed whether it’s a walk in the woods or the pleasures of a natural vegan body cream.

Some of our competitors promote store-style beauty. We are not competing with a model made up for window dressing. For us beauty lies in who you are, not who you “should” be. It’s what you fill your day with, what you invest in, what you push out and pull in. Our energy seeds interaction with nature, beauty and each other. We are stewards of a sophisticated sense of wellness and enduring beauty.

We don’t work by committee. We have no trend watchers or a high ad budget. But we know what’s good and what’s not.  We are constantly looking for new chances to evolve and improve, to elevate all that is best with YASOU natural skin care products and the people who support us through their purchases.  We are mindful of all the options available. Our mission with this blog is to provide you with factual information based on science but also entertaining ideas that connect the dots between natural skin care, culture and wellness.      

Get ready. We think 2020 will be a wonderful year for you, your skin and everyone who is touched by you.

Best Regards,

Mary Klest

YASOU Skin Care Blog Topics In 2020

Happy 2020! We hope you had wonderful holidays. It’s a new year with new goals and ambitions. Here at YASOU Skin Care we are excited and energized to present skin care posts that educate and entertain.  We want to bring you the best and most current topics in natural skin care. We have a lot to talk about! Here are just some of the topics we will cover in this blog during 2020.

Sustainable, Clean Beauty. 2020 will be all about sustainability and environmental ethics, the new decade will be essential to the wellbeing of our planet, protecting our oceans and water supply.  The beauty industry will be playing a huge role!

PreBiotics: New Food For Your Skin.   We all know that good health and glowing skin starts from the inside out and then outside in, looing into what the deal is with ProBiotics and PreBiotics.  What are they? Do you need both? What are the benefits?

Skin Care Goes Global-Lessons Learned From Other Cultures.  Looking at the history of skin care from different cultures around the world, we will be bringing you our research insights on what we have learned from different cultures on how to care for your skin.

+MORE.   Take a look at our info graphic for more subjects we plan on talking about this year. Make sure you register for our e-newsletter so you can stay informed about our newest promotions, events, sales and giveaways. Looking forward to 2020 with you.

 

YASOU!

 

 

What Native Americans Could Have Taught Pilgrims About Skin Care

Jamestown colonist John Smith observed that Powhatan Indians in Virginia followed a daily regime of bathing in waterways each morning before the sun appeared. They would then make an offering to the sun spirit and return home for breakfast. In cleansing every day and eating healthy foods the Native Americans had established a natural skin care routine. One the Pilgrims seemed to have ignored.

 

When the pilgrims arrived at Plymouth, they bathed only a few times a year. They believed the water to be unhealthy. According to Kathleen M Brown, author of Foul Bodies, pilgrims believed the textiles they wore would absorb dirt and body sweat. They wrongly associated moral and spiritual purity with physical cleanliness. Half of the Mayflower occupants died within the first two months of their arrival, mostly to contagious disease while still aboard the ship.

 

In their villages, Native American tribes built sweat lodges near a waterway. About eight people, one of whom was a healer, would enter the lodge once it was heated. A central hearth was lined with bark and large hot stones. The healer would drip droplets of water on the stones creating steam and then sprinkle water on the people inside the lodge. They would remain in the lodge’s intense heat for as long as they could, then rushed out and plunged their bodies into the waterway nearby. Such rituals were used to heal, give thanks, and purify the mind and body.

 

Heat increases the blood flow at the surface of the skin and may help with some skin disorders. Today, celebrities including Gwyneth Paltrow, Selena Gomez, and Demi Moore are reportedly visiting urban sweat lodges that use electric blankets and infrared technology to raise their body temperature to create a radiant skin glow. Doctors will say that sweating detoxifies the skin and body in a natural way. So, the native Americans were definitely on to something. Sweat actually rids the skin of dirt and impurities, much more efficiently than textiles ever will. However, it is important to build up a heat tolerance and drink plenty of water to replenish the body if you want to benefit from a sweat lodge or sauna experience.

 

Native Americans brushed their teeth with charcoal from the fire, using a finger to rub the teeth, and then rinsed with water. They had no soaps or disinfectants. They turned to plants to moisturize and heal their skin. They ground up corn to cleanse and exfoliate their skin. Berries from evergreen shrubs were used in teas. They found roots’ inner stems could be dried and powdered to act as rubs for the face during cold winter months. Chapped skin was treated with a grass wash. Wild native plants contained essential oils that released scents and soothed skin.

 

The Wampanoag Indians in Plymouth ate fowl, fish, nuts and cranberries – all organic. Their diet was high in protein with low sodium and no fat. Some tribe members lived to be 100 years old. They believed all living beings are related and that we are all equal. They held celebrations throughout the seasons including New Year in the spring, strawberries and corn in the summer; cranberries in the fall, and the solstice in winter.

 

In October of 1621 in southeastern Massachusetts, 90 Wampanoag Indians and 53 Pilgrims gathered to celebrate the settlers’ first harvest. Under the candlelight, the good feelings from fellowship were sure to make their skin glow. A modern-day member of the Wampanoag tribe, Randy Joseph, expressed a thought we can all learn from: “The great Creator who created all life gave us all that we needed to live a healthy life. In return, we give thanks every day.”

Fabrics Your Skin Will Love

Materials that we choose to wear effect the health of our skin and well being, as well as our stance on sustainability and living a cruelty free lifestyle! I was so excited to research this subject and report my findings to you. Some materials we will be discussing are plant based and vegan, others are not. We want to give you choices of materials that we found interesting and good for your skin, giving you information that can help you make better choices for your lifestyle and needs. Overall, we believe natural fabrics are always the best choice for your skin and health.

 

Natural materials:

 

  1. Organic Cotton (GOT cotton). GOT is a certification that the cotton is organic. Organic cotton minimizes environmental impact by removing the use of cancer-causing pesticides and other chemicals in the production process. Instead it focuses on a holistic process that puts sustainability first. Cotton is also better for your body – being a natural fiber, it is very breathable, hypoallergenic, natural, vegan and cruelty-free

    NOTE: When buying products made of cotton, look out for certified organic labeling, and make sure it isn’t a blend fabric.

 

  1. Linen. Linen is an ancient sustainable fabric made from the stem of the flax plant. It is super durable and becomes softer and stronger the more that it is used. It also warms you in winter and cools you in warmer weather.It is natural, vegan and cruelty-free.

 

  1. Pinatex (Pineapple Leather). The leaves of the pineapple plant have recently become one of the most sustainable vegan leather alternatives on the market. This material is made from pineapple leaf fiber. It’s a new, innovative fabric conceptualized by Ananas Anam. It is natural, vegan and biodegradable.

 

  1. Upcycled Leather. By employing the practice of upcycling, we avoid creating new materials which minimizes waste and saves natural resources such as energy and water. Leather is a durable, strong, breathable, eco-friendly material that lasts forever and gets better within time.  If you choose not to endorse animal products, there are some great alternative leather options that are made from plants such as cork and pineapple.

 

  1. Lyocell. This material is made from wood pulp. It is a great substitute for silk. It’s soft and drapes well. It can be washed, dyed and even woven to mimic the qualities of suede, leather, moleskin or wool. Lycocell keeps the skin warm in cooler weather and cool in warmer weather. It is also, eco-friendly, vegan, biodegradable, highly absorbent and an antibacterial fabric that is safe for sensitive skin.It’s just a great fabric!

 

  1. 100% Pure Silk. Silk is a natural fiber, but it is not vegan. It is extremely soft, non-irritate to even the most sensitive skin, free of any chemicals, hypoallergenic, decreases skin’s loss of moisture, and promotes rejuvenation of the skin. Thus it helps prevent some effects of aging, relieves dry, flaky skin conditions by locking moisture in and ensuring it stays on the skin. Silk keeps you cool on hot days and warm on cold ones. It is highly absorbent, dries fast and is extremely strong.

 

  1. SeaCell (Seaweed). Dried seaweed is crushed coarsely, ground, and simultaneously introduced into cellulose fiber, from which materials for a wide variety of textiles, known as SeaCell, are manufactured. Brown algae is used in this material and supposedly activates cell regeneration, re-mineralizes skin, limits inflammation, soothes itchiness and detoxifies the body. The porous structure of the SeaCell textile fibers promotes humidity intake and release, which keeps you warm in the winter and cool in the summer.

 

  1. Hemp. We just couldn’t leave this one out. These days it’s everywhere and in everything (at least some form of it). Hemp comes from the stem of the plant. It is one of the oldest fibers in the world, and one of the most sustainable fabrics! It is similar to linen in feel and breathability, keeping you warm in winter and cool in summer and becomes softer with time. It is also a highly UV-resistant fabric, so it’s great for beachwear.

    NOTE: Make sure natural dyes are used when purchasing hemp clothing to negate the detrimental effects of harsh chemical dyes on people and plane.

 

Image: Jack Reigate | pexels

Normal Changes in Aging Skin

Let’s face it, we cannot escape or hide from aging and the signs of it. Our skin is the first indicator of aging. There are normal and abnormal skin changes related to aging. Today we are going to look at the normal ones, why? I believe this discussion will help prevent abnormal skin changes by addressing the normal skin changes. Abnormal skin changes can result from medications, poor nutrition, dehydration, illnesses and excessive sun exposure.

Normal changes are visible lines, thinner skin, drier skin, the loss of elasticity and the loss of collagen in our skin. These are some of the obvious normal skin changes that we can do something about to help slow down the process or alter it so we do not start experiencing abnormal skin changes.  Some basic preventative actions we can take are:

  1. Stop Smoking.If you are not a smoker than you are a mile ahead!
  2. Don’t stay in the sun for longer than 5-10 minutes! If you want to swim or do outside activities than make sure you use natural sunscreen (look for zinc oxide).
  3. Eat healthy and drink water. This is the time to get a physical and address any health issues you may be having or how to avoid them.  Meet with a dietician. It will be worth it to help get you on track. Cut down on your meat consumption!
  4. Drink less alcohol, soda and sugary juices.
  5. Start exercising your body and your face. That’s right you need to keep your facial muscles fit as well as the rest of your body. Read our blog post Keep Your Facial Muscles Fit to help you get going.
  6. Care for your skin from head to toe. Use natural products to cleanse, exfoliate, and moisturize your skin.

Start now. Make healthy skin a priority. The basic changes we mention above can really make a difference in how your skin ages and your overall health. Let’s get healthier, it’s never too late.

I want to help you get a jump-start so I’ve decided to offer a giveaway of YASOU’s vegan cellular day cream.  Our vegan day cream has so many great properties and benefits, including:

1)  Light exfoliation
2)  Firming & Brightening
3)  Promotes Elasticity
4)  Collagen production
5)  Pore tightening
6)  Evens skin tone
7) Acts as a primer
8) Hydration

 

To learn more about our 99.4% natural unisex, vegan day cream you can visit: yasouskincare.com.

To enter the giveaway please email your full name, address, email address and phone number to terry@yasouskincare.com

We will be announcing the winner on October 21, 2019.  Good luck and YASOU!

(photo: Ola Orlikowska photography)

Keep Your Facial Muscles Fit

Is there a healthy, natural alternative to surgery or injections for achieving a more youthful looking face? Do-it-yourself facial exercise programs have been in existence for years. When Gary Sikorski, founder of Happy Face Yoga, first tried to promote his program to the medical community and media, they refused him saying there was no proof that it worked. Several years later he got the proof he needed. Researchers at Northwestern University conducted a clinical study using his facial exercises. Results showed the participants’ faces did appear younger as determined by dermatologists. Participants were women aged 40 to 65 years. The study results were published in JAMA Dermatology. Sikorski says the program strategy is simple: keep your facial muscles fit. Some users have described it as a natural face lift.

Sikorskihas been teaching facial exercises for 13 years to men and women. In this sample video he demonstrates two of his exercises. Because we’re always on the prowl for science-based, natural solutions we called him to learn more about the program and how it might complement a natural skin care routine.

 

How is Happy Face Yoga different from other programs?

It emphasizes muscle resistance facial exercises. Your fingers, hands, palms apply resistance on the muscles which builds the muscle faster and better. Others use pulsing, light touch, massage. It’s a different technique.

In the study, sixteen participants received the full 20-week intervention, but eleven dropped out. How do people stay motivated to complete the program?

The challenge is to practice on a daily basis. You have to learn the exercises. In the first couple of weeks you will see a difference in your complexion due to increases of blood flow to the face which boosts collagen and elastin, making skin cells healthier.  Between 6 to 12 weeks the more you do it, the better the results. It’s like going to the gym to work out your body. You have to put the time in.

 

Is the Happy Face Yoga program appropriate for all ages?

Yes. Young people can start early and maintain their muscle tone. Many people in their 40s and 50s notice signs of aging and become concerned. Factors such as heredity, sun exposure, nutrition, and hydration have an impact. But as we age the muscles weaken, so it may be harder to strengthen them if you are in your seventies, but not impossible.

 

You include yoga type breathing in the exercises. Why?

Some people hold a lot of stress in their face. Yoga breathing helps them relax and slow down. The exercises should not be rushed. It also helps in keeping the poses, some of which are held for 30 seconds.

 

Is there a regimen or routine you would suggest when using the program?

Everybody is different. Some people want to work on a certain area, so they choose those exercises first to meet their goal. Two exercises are for the whole face that I recommend everyone do. There’s no downside. Just remember that the muscles of the face need to be worked daily. It can be at any time of day. The exercises can be broken up into different segments if you don’t have time to do them all at once.

 

Happy Face Yoga includes a lot of smiling. Will that form crow’s feet around the eyes?

That’s a myth! Smiling is good for you. Touching your face while applying resistance to your muscles is also okay. Facial skin attaches to your muscles, so toning muscles actually tightens and smooths out fine lines.

The more we talked with Sikorski the more we got interested in seeing for ourselves how well it works. He was kind enough to send us the Happy Yoga Face written exercise card package. We will try it and report back on the experience in an upcoming blog. Until then, keep your smile on.   (photography: Tom Ward)

Vegan Skin Care for Summer Acne

This summer was brutal for my skin, even at my age I still suffer from adult cystic acne.  My flair ups have been far and few but this summer it was non-stop. I just couldn’t completely clear up the break out and get it into submission.

I sweated more than usual this summer and with this came the breakouts. As often as I cleansed, the hair follicles clogged accumulating sebum and bacteria.   I think you get the picture.  I want to share with you some basic preventative steps that I  have been practicing this summer and finding fast relief and results.

 

1) Keep your hands away from your face. Make sure you wash your hands first before touching your face or neck.

2)  Do not pop pimples or try to, unless they are ready to be popped and use tissue.

3)  Cleanse gently with a glycerin soap and wash with cold water.

4)  Let your skin breathe. Try not using heavy makeup or powders in the summer. Touch up cover up is recommended.

5)  On those extremely humid, hot days tie your hair back in a bun, ponytail or braid so it isn’t touching your face.

6)  Use a natural spray-on sunscreen lightly and bring a hat if you are spending time in direct sun light.

7) Avoid heavy, animal-based moisturizers and products that contain a great deal of fat in them.

8)  Keep your makeup brushes clean. If you are using a towel to pat dry your face after washing, make sure you have a clean one daily or at least every other day for usage.

9).  Touch up treatments for cystic acne is different than regular acne so look into what is best for your situation.  For my cystic acne I’ll do a mixture of Manuka, Tea Tree, Rosemary Verbenone, Juniper and Clary Sage essential oils and dab them on the infected area only.  I’ve also heard Oregano, Clove, Lemongrass, Lavender and Frankincense essential oils can be great alternatives.

10) After removing your makeup and cleansing your face go ahead and dilute some “Braggs Organic Apple Cider Vinegar (with the mother) with some water and a cotton ball. Do a second light cleansing to your skin.  You’ll have to figure out what concentration is right for your skin type. I use it full strength and do not dilute it at all but I don’t recommend this for everyone.

11)  Before bedtime after you have cleansed and applied your vinegar mix go ahead and apply a vegan night cream that contains sodium hyaluronate (this is the plant-based hyaluronate acid. Use lightly and maybe kick back to three or four times a week depending on your skin needs.  YASOU vegan cell renewal night cream has been a huge asset to my summer skin care regime and my cystic acne flair ups, keeping my skin hydrated, balanced and my skin barrier intact.

12)  Use silk pillowcases – it makes all the difference to your skin.

 

I hope you find some of these steps helpful. As basic as they seem they have made a world of difference for my skin this summer.  As you can see all the steps are natural, animal-free solutions.  If you know of any other basic steps please email them to me at terry@yasouskincare.com and we’ll send you a gift.

YASOU!