Scary Skin Care Stories. . . Halloween Makeup Removal Tips

Halloween has arrived and I’ve been hearing some scary skin care stories. Don’t try to trick your skin, treat it well and avoid mistakes as described in these tales.

 

Horrifying breakouts from heavy makeup

A friend’s teenage daughter left her Halloween makeup on all night and woke up with a shiny, red, bumpy face. Her mom created a scrub using two teaspoons of baking soda and one teaspoon of water to cleanse and exfoliate her daughter’s skin. Oily, heavy makeup left on the skinmixes with dead skincells to clog pores, trapping bacteriainside and causing acne. Halloween face makeup is usually oil-based, heavier and thicker than every day makeup so don’t get spooked by clogged pores. While makeup may be a safer alternative to wearing a Halloween mask, don’t forget to cleanse well before the witching hour and don’t go to bed without washing your face no matter how much fun you’ve had!

 

Bacteria communities

Here’s a creepy, yet healthy discovery made by researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute. Our skin is crawling with hundreds of kinds of bacteria in moist creases behind our ears and under our neck, to the webs of our toes, the navel and the fold between our eyes. Dry areas of the skin also contain bacteria, but it is less diverse. “Our results underscore that skin is home to vibrant communities of microbial life, which may significantly influence our health,” said researcher Elizabeth A. Grice. Another harmless, but unsettling reality is that microscopic mites graze on oils, skin cells and other microbes on our face.   This is a good reason we recommend you prep your skin for Halloween by cleansing, moisturizing well and using a primer before applying your Halloween make-up.

 

Face mask mistakes

If you decide to apply a facial mask, make sure your young children are away or asleep. A friend covered her face with a green, organic facial mask to refresh her skin. When her two-year old son saw her, he screamed and ran away in fear of not knowing what had happened to his mother’s face. She had to wash off the expensive mask in order to calm him down.  As a final step to cleansing your skin after removing your Halloween makeup especially for dry or sensitive skin we recommend applying a hydrating, calming mask followed by a vegan night moisturizer.

 

Check Your Skin Care and Makeup Labels

After finding an old jar of moisturizer in her bathroom, a woman started using it again only to find her skin inflamed with sensations of burning and irritation. If you notice any change in your product’s texture, color, or smell throw it away.  For Halloween makeup invest in some professional theatre-level makeup instead of the cheap options at the local drug store this can help you avoid the possibility of a nightmare scenario for your skin.

 

Check your labels for harmful ingredients such as heavy metals, formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers and petrolatum. Look for comedogenic ingredients like, acetylated lanolin, D&C red and octyl stearate, as well as, occlusive ingredients to name a few and say no thank you!

 

Dirty, yucky makeup brushes

Perhaps the most often committed skin sin is not cleaning your makeup brushes. Unwashed makeup brushes can become a breeding ground for dirt and bad bacteria that causes breakouts in the skin.  Rashes, blisters, irritation, clogged pores and other skin ailments can occur when using dirty makeup brushes. A friend who admitted to not cleaning her brushes regularly, saw a small cyst forming on her face. She thought it would go away, but years later the bump remains on her face. Dirt also diminishes the performance of your brushes. What was once blending can appear as streaks making makeup application a hassle.  For Halloween we suggest purchasing brushes that you can dispose after usage, let them go!

 

Alternative costumes

Instead of heavy makeup costumes think of Halloween characters or concepts that do not involve a great deal of makeup.  Some ideas Cat woman, Wednesday Addams, Cousin It, Men in Black, paper doll costume and Miss Universe to name a few.  Think of concepts that may involve building or creating items, using clothes or wigs to enhance your Halloween costume!

 

Don’t be haunted by these scary skin care stories. Love your skin, use the tips and these potential skincare nightmares will turn into sweet dreams.

(image: Wendelin Jacober/pexels)

Fabrics Your Skin Will Love

Materials that we choose to wear effect the health of our skin and well being, as well as our stance on sustainability and living a cruelty free lifestyle! I was so excited to research this subject and report my findings to you. Some materials we will be discussing are plant based and vegan, others are not. We want to give you choices of materials that we found interesting and good for your skin, giving you information that can help you make better choices for your lifestyle and needs. Overall, we believe natural fabrics are always the best choice for your skin and health.

 

Natural materials:

 

  1. Organic Cotton (GOT cotton). GOT is a certification that the cotton is organic. Organic cotton minimizes environmental impact by removing the use of cancer-causing pesticides and other chemicals in the production process. Instead it focuses on a holistic process that puts sustainability first. Cotton is also better for your body – being a natural fiber, it is very breathable, hypoallergenic, natural, vegan and cruelty-free

    NOTE: When buying products made of cotton, look out for certified organic labeling, and make sure it isn’t a blend fabric.

 

  1. Linen. Linen is an ancient sustainable fabric made from the stem of the flax plant. It is super durable and becomes softer and stronger the more that it is used. It also warms you in winter and cools you in warmer weather.It is natural, vegan and cruelty-free.

 

  1. Pinatex (Pineapple Leather). The leaves of the pineapple plant have recently become one of the most sustainable vegan leather alternatives on the market. This material is made from pineapple leaf fiber. It’s a new, innovative fabric conceptualized by Ananas Anam. It is natural, vegan and biodegradable.

 

  1. Upcycled Leather. By employing the practice of upcycling, we avoid creating new materials which minimizes waste and saves natural resources such as energy and water. Leather is a durable, strong, breathable, eco-friendly material that lasts forever and gets better within time.  If you choose not to endorse animal products, there are some great alternative leather options that are made from plants such as cork and pineapple.

 

  1. Lyocell. This material is made from wood pulp. It is a great substitute for silk. It’s soft and drapes well. It can be washed, dyed and even woven to mimic the qualities of suede, leather, moleskin or wool. Lycocell keeps the skin warm in cooler weather and cool in warmer weather. It is also, eco-friendly, vegan, biodegradable, highly absorbent and an antibacterial fabric that is safe for sensitive skin.It’s just a great fabric!

 

  1. 100% Pure Silk. Silk is a natural fiber, but it is not vegan. It is extremely soft, non-irritate to even the most sensitive skin, free of any chemicals, hypoallergenic, decreases skin’s loss of moisture, and promotes rejuvenation of the skin. Thus it helps prevent some effects of aging, relieves dry, flaky skin conditions by locking moisture in and ensuring it stays on the skin. Silk keeps you cool on hot days and warm on cold ones. It is highly absorbent, dries fast and is extremely strong.

 

  1. SeaCell (Seaweed). Dried seaweed is crushed coarsely, ground, and simultaneously introduced into cellulose fiber, from which materials for a wide variety of textiles, known as SeaCell, are manufactured. Brown algae is used in this material and supposedly activates cell regeneration, re-mineralizes skin, limits inflammation, soothes itchiness and detoxifies the body. The porous structure of the SeaCell textile fibers promotes humidity intake and release, which keeps you warm in the winter and cool in the summer.

 

  1. Hemp. We just couldn’t leave this one out. These days it’s everywhere and in everything (at least some form of it). Hemp comes from the stem of the plant. It is one of the oldest fibers in the world, and one of the most sustainable fabrics! It is similar to linen in feel and breathability, keeping you warm in winter and cool in summer and becomes softer with time. It is also a highly UV-resistant fabric, so it’s great for beachwear.

    NOTE: Make sure natural dyes are used when purchasing hemp clothing to negate the detrimental effects of harsh chemical dyes on people and plane.

 

Image: Jack Reigate | pexels