Scary Skin Care Stories

Halloween is around the corner and I’ve been hearing some scary skin care stories. Don’t try to trick your skin, treat it well and avoid mistakes as described in these tales.

Horrifying breakouts from heavy makeup
A friend’s teenage daughter left her Halloween makeup on all night and woke up with a shiny, red, bumpy face. Her mom created a scrub using two teaspoons of baking soda and one teaspoon of water to cleanse and exfoliate her daughter’s skin. Oily, heavy makeup left on the skinmixes with dead skincells to clog pores, trapping bacteriainside and causing acne. Halloween face makeup is usually oil-based, heavier and thicker than every day makeup so don’t get spooked by clogged pores. While makeup may be a safer alternative to wearing a Halloween mask, don’t forget to cleanse well when the witching hour comes.

Bacteria communities
Here’s a creepy, yet healthy discovery made by researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute. Our skin is crawling with hundreds of kinds of bacteria in moist creases behind our ears and under our neck, to the webs of our toes, the navel and the fold between our eyes. Dry areas of the skin also contain bacteria, but it is less diverse. “Our results underscore that skin is home to vibrant communities of microbial life, which may significantly influence our health,” said researcher Elizabeth A. Grice. Another harmless, but unsettling reality is that microscopic mites graze on oils, skin cells and other microbes on our face.

Face mask mistakes
If you decide to apply a facial mask, make sure your young children are away or asleep. A friend covered her face with a green, organic facial mask to refresh her skin. When her two-year old son saw her, he screamed and ran away in fear of not knowing what had happened to his mother’s face. She had to wash off the expensive mask in order to calm him down.

Skin care products gone bad
After finding an old jar of moisturizer in her bathroom, a woman started using it again only to find her skin inflamed with sensations of burning and irritation. If you notice any change in your product’s texture, color, or smell throw it away. Sunscreen shelf life is about two years. Shampoo lasts for years if you keep the bottle closed. The same holds true for soaps if they remain in their packaging before use. Quality moisturizers and serums can last up to two years. Always apply with clean hands and fingers to avoid spreading infection.

Also, people who neglect or misread skin care product instructions risk skin hazards including discoloration or irritation. It’s always important to read the instructions on how to use all products properly. Harsh ingredients used incorrectly can result in multiple skin nightmares.

Dirty, yucky makeup brushes
Perhaps the most often committed skin sin is not cleaning your makeup brushes. Unwashed makeup brushes can become a breeding ground for dirt and bad bacteria that causes breakouts in the skin.  Rashes, blisters, irritation, clogged pores and other skin ailments can occur when using dirty makeup brushes. A friend who admitted to not cleaning her brushes regularly, saw a small cyst forming on her face. She thought it would go away, but years later the bump remains on her face. Dirt also diminishes the performance of your brushes. What was once blending can appear as streaks making makeup application a hassle.

An unlikely culprit
A pillow case can serve as a great ghost costume or candy collector but while sleepingplacing your face directly on the pillow case causes friction on the skin which can lead to wrinkles and create forehead lines. Facedown sleepers may experience more skin breakouts. That’s because dirt and oil from the pillow and grease from your hair is in contact with the skin. Sleep on your back with your head elevated a bit. Flat sleepers may experience puffy eyes due to fluid buildup. Wash your sheets and pillow cases at least once a week to avoid impurities on your skin. Apply a hydrating body cream. Also, remember to apply a hydrating night cream on your face to moisturize your skin and support your body’s natural night time renewal processes.

Don’t be haunted by these scary skin care stories. Love your skin and these nightmares will turn into sweet dreams.

Skin, The Sense of Touch and More.

 

“A touch isn’t just a touch. It’s a kiss from the soul, onto the skin” . . . .

The words above made me think about how our skin interprets the sense of touch.  It’s mind-boggling if you think deeply into it. One thing I realized is that our skin’s health is so much more than addressing dry skin or aging. It’s deeper than that.

Our skin is the door to feeling touch. How?

RECEPTORS: Your skin has many types of receptors in your body, they are grouped in three categories 1) Thermoreceptors, that do what?  2) Nociceptors, that do what? and 3) Mechanoreceptors, that do what?

Each receptor is a structure that gathers information from the environment. That data is then changed into a signal that can be understood by your nervous system.  The receptors that let the body sense touch are located in the top layers of the skin (the dermis and epidermis). They are small in size and collect super accurate information when touched.  These receptors in the skin allow a person to feel sensations like pressure, pain, temperature and physical change like an object pressing firmly or just brushing against the skin. And of course. . .

Can these receptors transmit emotions and love? Well, there are two touch systems 1) discriminative touch and 2) emotional.  You can do some research to learn more about them if you like. What I have learned from my research is that touch can communicate tenderness, compassion, anger, love, gratitude, happiness and fear within mere seconds. Touch is a fundamental human need from the time we are born and essential for physical, emotional and social health and it all starts with your skin!

The importance of skin health becomes more visible as we age.  When we age our sense of touch starts to deteriorate because our skin is aging.  Aging skin becomes thinner, more fragile, and starts losing the protective fat layer giving an aging person skin disorders such as … Aging can affect the receptors and how they communicate. Our sense of touch, pressure, vibration and temperature control start to diminish.

Taking care of your skin at a younger age can keep it healthier effecting your health and happiness as you age.  Take the time to nurture your skin and celebrate your own sense of touch. Make it a part of your daily regime and lifestyle.

In her poem “A touch isn’t just a touch” Sarah L. Harvey writes about touch:  “It’s the sensation of one’s soul, whispering to one’s fingertips” Think about how touch influences your day.